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English Poetry: Bonny Palm, Philip Anderson and Christian Kelnberger

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Bonny Palm (Piano)

Bonny Palm was born in Nottingham, England. At the age of seven she took her first piano lessons with her mother to finally obtain a Scholarship as a Junior Exhibitioner at the Royal Academy of Music, London at the age of eleven.
Studies in German literature in England. In 1985 she became a pupil of Gernot Sieber at the Richard-Strauss-Conservatory, Munich. Final exams as a music teacher in 1990, piano performing exams in 1993.
Numerous performances as a soloist and in a wide variety of chamber music ensembles, teaching activities.
In April 2002 she produced her first CD European Piano Music.

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Philip Anderson

Philip Anderson grew up in Norfolk, England. Before moving to Germany in 1980 he studied history at York University. From 1987-1994 M.A. and Ph.D. (history) at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich. He was an actor in several stage pieces. His professional activities are based on work with handicapped people and on the integration of foreigners.
Since 2007 he is professor for migration studies at the University of Applied Sciences in Regensburg.

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Reviews

'Trio for Two Cats and a Trombone' was the title of one of this evening's poems. Anybody who would be assuming now that it would be an English evening with two cats singing and a trombone playing would go far amiss. The three musicians were out for an evening where they wanted to bring together english poetry from five centuries with its corresponding music. (...)
The audience was enthousiastic about the cabaret-like performance of the trio and applauded for an encore. English humour, English poetry and English music proved to be a fine mixture and demonstrated that poetry evenings don't have to be simply romantic or even a bit dull sometimes - quite on the contrary and as in this case they can be most amusing stuff'.
(SÜDDEUTSCHE ZEITUNG)
 
'A first class concert which left nothing unfulfilled concerning artistic perfection. (...)  Philip Andersons punctilliously recited poems formed a beautiful counterpoint to the musical pieces. (...) The trio managed to span a bow from the Renaissance to pieces from the 20th century - not an easy thing to do. What remained was the impression of a very remarkable  level of artistic achievement and high professionalism.'
(MITTELBAYERISCHE ZEITUNG)